Emergency Preparedness

Unit Emergency Preparedness

Posted on

imageDo you know about Emergency Preparedness BSA? This is not just a merit badge or belt loop. It is for Cubs, Scouts, Venturers, Scouters, Units, and Districts.image

Now what can you imagine we can do in your unit or as a district?

Why is Attending this Emergency Preparedness Camporee so Important?

Posted on Updated on

Camporee is important because Emergency Preparedness is important.

I am often interested in receiving ideas for articles that are interesting and timely. This article is due to a suggestion from Troop 343’s John Ruggles. The link he sent demonstrates that the general public is most prepared for emergencies if they have practiced emergency preparedness skills.

In 2009, FEMA conducted the Citizens Corp[s] National Survey of “Personal Preparedness in America ( http://www.citizencorps.gov/down… ).

The Citizens Corp[s] Preparedness survey highlighted several aspects of “preparedness”:

  • Having disaster supplies
  • Having a household plan
  • Familiarity with community systems
  • Volunteer experience with a community safety organization
  • Knowledge of immediate response
  • Participation in drills
  • Preparedness training

It seems obvious when you say it, but research shows that people who receive preparedness training are more likely to be prepared.

And involvement in related projects demonstrably increases actual preparedness, more than just about any other factor:

Individuals who had been involved in a community safety program (74%) or a disaster response team (71%) were significantly more likely to have disaster supplies in their home as compared to those who had not volunteered (52% and 50%, respectively).

I also found the comment from Daniel Smith particularly useful. He reminded me of the 2012 Baylor University study of the impact of scouting on the scouts. Daniel sums up the study rather succinctly this way,

In short, the study discovered a trend between those involved in the Scouting program and their future successes in life. Some of the noted trends include “higher levels of planning and preparation skills,” a higher chance to “be in a leadership position at their place of employment or local community,” and they “report [to have] closer relationships with family and friends.” So, one can infer that Scouting alumni are better prepared than the average citizen for many aspects of life.

The BSA has done a nice job of reducing some of these findings into marketing brochures that you may have seen in the past.

Please make sure to consider some of this material as you prepare Scoutmaster Minutes, skits, and games for Camporee and in the immediate follow up. Reinforce a great message.

Thanks again to John Ruggles for the lead on a good story.