Advancement

Service Hour Reporting Methods

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Recently, the Council asked the District Key 3 to review the statistics of their districts.

In reviewing North Star’s Service Hours, we are missing lots of information from our active units.Messenger of Peace

Remember we are working toward one billion hours of service in scouting by 2020. Your service hours help us get to that goal.

Make sure that your Advancement Coordinator reports your service hours. One person should be responsible for this information from each unit. Log in to my.scouting.org. Go to the Legacy Tools. Report Service Hours.

These reports include all individual and unit efforts. They include Lion Cub efforts and Eagle Scout projects.

Emergency Mobilization

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Thanks to Frank Otte, Scoutmaster of Troop 358, for bringing this to my attention.

Here is a terrific opporutunity for scouts who need to work on their Emergency Preparedness Merit Badge.Date of E-Prep

Come join us; learn and have fun! The Marion County Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC) is teaming up with Eskenazi Health, IU Health – Methodist, Riley and University, the VA Medical Center, IUPUI, Indianapolis EMS (IEMS), Indianapolis Fire Department (IFD), MESH and other agencies for a full scale Hazardous Materials Exercise.

We are requesting volunteers from each of the hospitals and service groups to volunteer to participate. Not only are we seeking adults, but also children, ideally ages 8-18.

This is a great experience for Scout and faith- based groups that are looking for an activity geared toward badge work; Emergency Preparedness or community volunteer hours. We do ask that we have an adult per 5 or 6 children as a chaperone.

Please let us know if you have younger children that would like to participate. There are opportunities for the children (and adults if you want to) to wear their swimsuit and get “showered”/de-conned by the Indianpolis

Fire Department and/or at the hospitals.

Flyer for download

District Eagle Report June 2017

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Jerry Simon, District Eagle Board Coordinator, reports that the following scouts passed their Eagle Boards of Review on Wednesday, June 14, 2017.June 2017 Eagles

Congratulations to our newest Eagle Scouts!Eagle pin

At the halfway point in 2017 that gives us 24 Eagle Scouts. In 2016 we had 49 Eagle Scouts. If recollection serves, we had 53 in 2015.

Lessons from Memorial Day: Eagle Project Ideas

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One of the lessons we learned from the Memorial Day grave dressings is that our cemetaries in North Star need a lot of tender loving care. I took some photos of Fall Creek Cemetary at just eat of the 4000 block of Keystone at Millersville Rd. (Unfortunately, I don’t have my camera with me to post the photo. I will try to post it here later.)

The fencing and edging looked like something out of Scooby Doo.

There are reportedly a number of Pioneer Cemetaries in the District that need some clean up.

While Eagle Projects cannot involve maintenance like mowing, they can beautify and restore weathered older facilities. Troop 343 recently had an example of that.

Also in placing Memorial Flags at the cemetaries, we saw how many veterans were not getting flags placed at their graves. Our mission Saturday was to place flags at past members of the American Legion. Not all veterans are members of the American Legion. That means that many were skipped, even though their gravestones clearly identify their unit of service and often the war in which they served.

This lends an opportunity to an Eagle Candidate to help assure that we can better serve these late veterans and their families. I don’t know what Crown Hill has on record about the veterans buried there. I have asked for better maps from them. Hopefully we will find out at the District Committee meeting tomorrow when Crown Hill’s staff might visit us.

Think about Eagle Projects for all of these cemetaries in our District. There are plenty of opportunities for lasting effects from our Eagles.

 

The Clique

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From Troop 343 Assistant Scoutmaster Andrew Himebaugh:

“The Clique”
Word has been received that the Troop is run by a clique.  Upon investigation we find that this statement is TRUE.
Furthermore, we find that this clique is composed of faithful members and loving parents who are present at each meeting; who willingly accept appointment to committees; who freely give of their time to teach skills to the Scouts; to look out for each other; and to serve in a wide variety of ways.
They are those who sincerely believe that the more one puts into his Troop, the more he gets out of it.
The strange thing about this clique is that it is very easy to get into.
All one needs to do is demonstrate a lively interest in the organization, make constructive suggestions and accept responsibility when asked to do so.
Show a continued interest in all the affairs of the Troop and before you realize it, you will be a member of the clique. . . . And you will be surprised how very happy they are to have you!
adapted from The Master Mason, Aug 1962.
 

Congratulations May 2017 Eagles

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Congratulations to our May 2017 Eagle Scouts, pending ratification from the National Advancement Team, their dates in rank will be Wednesday, May 10, 2017.

Sugar Creek Merit Badge Counselor Training

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Merit Badge Counselor Training – May 18th, from 7:00 to 9:00 – Lebanon Branch of Church of Jesus Christ LDS – 2291 Witt Rd, Lebanon, IN

We have an important training opportunity for all scouters, parents of new scouts who want to contribute to the program, and adults who have the skill sets needed to be a merit badge counselor. Please make sure that all your merit badge counselors, and potential merit badge counselors, know about this training and strongly encourage them attend.  The training will be held at the Lebanon LDS Church building on Thursday, May 18th, from 7:00 to 9:00.  The trainer from the council will be Roger Schumacher.

As a merit badge counselor, your mission is to join fun with learning. You are both a teacher and mentor to the Scout as he works on a merit badge and learns by doing. By presenting opportunities for growth by way of engaging activities such as designing a Web page (Computers), performing an ollie and a wheelie (Snowboarding), or fabricating rope (Pioneering), you can pique a young man’s interest in the merit badge subject. Just think: Your hands-on involvement could inspire a Scout to develop a lifelong hobby, pursue a career, become an independent, self-supporting adult, and help the Scout advance toward becoming an Eagle Scout. By serving as a merit badge counselor, you offer your time, knowledge, and other resources so that Scouts can explore a topic of interest.

David Hovde

Sugar Creek District Training Chair

Congratulations to our April 2017 Eagle Scouts

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Congratulations to each of the following Eagle Scouts, who made rank at the specified Board of Review:

April 2017 Eagles

At a separate sitting of the Eagle Board of Review on April 21, 2017, Michael Knapp from Troop 180 (recently of T’Sun Gani District and now of North Star District).

Congratulations once again!

Upcoming MBU . . . at a real university

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There is a true Merit Badge University coming up. This term used to refer to opportunities to work on merit badges with university professors and researchers in the field.

Over the years, it has devolved into a generic term of any large gathering of merit badge classes.merit2bbadges

Wabash University is going back to the original concept . . . some of our district’s former scouts, according to rumor, helping organize it.

Here is more information from Jessica Hofman, Sugar Creek’s District Executive via Con Sullivan:

Want to learn about game design from a theater professor and video game reviewer?  Or help with a research study on turtle behavior as you learn the material for the Reptiles and Amphibians merit badge?  Or learn about astronomy from professors who have taught courses on Mayan archeoastronomy?  Or consider how buildings are designed from a Roman Architecture and Archeology expert?

These are just a few of the offerings at the Merit Badge College at Wabash on May 6th!  All of the badges (except First Aid) will be taught by college professors who are experts in the subject.  The cost is $20, and includes a T shirt and lunch.  There will be fun lunchtime activities and sessions for parents to learn about scouting and college opportunities.  You can register at https://www.scoutingevent.com/160-WabashMBC  Registration closes on April 15th, and classes will fill, so register early!

Wabash’s faculty already has a strong relationship with council. One of their economics professors is Sugar Creek’s district commissioner.

This is a great opportunity for older scouts to go visit the beautiful campus in Crawfordsville and work with Wabash’s impressive faculty . . . with no grade pressure!

Here is more information:

Sugar Creek District
2017 Wabash Merit Badge College
Join us for a great learning opportunity and chance to work on your merit badges at an awesome venue!  Join us at Wabash College for the first annual Wabash Merit Badge College.  Reserve your spot now!
  • The college will be at Wabash College in Crawfordsville, Indiana on Saturday, May 6th.
  • There will be two sessions (one from 9:30 to Noon and another from 1:30 to 4:00) with lunchtime activities in between.
  • Registration Cost is $20.00 for Scouts which includes courses, lunch, and a event T-shirt
All Day Merit Badges (requires both morning and afternoon sessions):
  • Robotics
  • Space Exploration
  • Reptile and Amphibian Study
  • Game Design
  • Animation
  • First Aid
Half Day Merit Badges (offered in one or both sessions, but does not require both sessions to complete):
  • Nuclear Science (afternoon, might open morning if there is enough demand)
  • Architecture (morning or afternoon)
  • Medicine (morning or afternoon)
  • Astronomy (morning)
  • Citizenship in the World (afternoon)
  • Family Life (morning)
Lunch Break Activities:
  • Chemistry Merit Badge
  • Ultimate Frisbee on the Mall
  • Activities for Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class Ranks (tree and plant identification, knot tying, flag etiquette, map and compass/GPS navigation course around campus)

Take a look!