Membership

REMINDERS Week of Nov 21 2018

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Have a blessed Thanksgiving holiday!

 

Reminders for upcoming activities and deadlines:

Popcorn:

  • Remember – final payment will be due to the CAC office by Nov. 30.  Thank you for your diligent sales efforts!

Adult Training:

  • “Train the Trainer” training will be held Sat. Dec. 1 – see this article for details.
  • Den Leader / Cubmaster training:  In-person training has wrapped up by this point – don’t forget that training is always available online at my.scouting.org!
  • The next Roundtable will be held on Thursday Dec. 16, see this article for details.

Order of the Arrow:

  • The next meeting of the Lowaneu Allanque Chapter of the Order of the Arrow is Sunday Dec. 2, 1 – 3pm at American Legion (Broad Ripple) Post 3, 6379 N. College Avenue, Indy.

Merit Badge Workshops and other Events:

  • Troop 56 is hosting two events to introduce Webelos to the next step in their adventure, and to get to know the Troop.  On Friday Dec. 7 there will be a Bounce Night with a light dinner afterwards; on Monday Dec. 10 there is a formal Webelos Welcome Night with the Troop.  Please see this article for more details.

Council Events:

  • The 2018 Silver Beaver Award Dinner will be held at Camp Belzer on Tuesday Dec. 4, social gathering begins at 6pm with dinner at 6:30pm.  Tickets are going quickly, and a $5 discount for early registration will be available until EOD November 23.  See this link to register.
  • The 2018 Governor’s Luncheon will be held at the JW Marriott on Monday Dec. 10, noon – 1:30pm.  See this article for more details.
  • North Star District Elections will be held on Thursday Dec. 20 at 7pm, Zionsville Town Hall.

Thanks all, and have a great week in Scouting!

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Come learn about Scouting with Troop 56!

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For Webelos (1s and 2s) interested in learning about Scouting with Troop 56, the Webelos Welcome Night is Monday December 10, 2018 from 7 – 8:30pm at “Luke’s Lodge” on the grounds at St. Luke’s United Methodist Church, 100 W. 86th St., Indy IN 46260.

Separately the Troop will be hosting a Bounce night (the teen version) followed by a light dinner on Friday December 7th, for Webelos 2’s that would be interested in learning about the Troop with a social activity as well.

Please see flyers attached:

 

Den Leader / Cubmaster Training 2018

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A Scout deserves a Trained Leader!

Please encourage those considering or appointed to Den Leader, Assistant Den Leader, Cubmaster, Assistant Cubmaster and anyone else interested to attend training held this fall at various locations and dates:

  1.  SEPTEMBER ROUNDTABLE (Sept. 13, 7pm);
  2.  District-sponsored in-person training:
    • SEPT. 27:  St. Luke’s UMC / Luke’s Lodge, 100 W. 86th St. Indy, 7pm
    • OCT. 23:  Zionsville Town Hall, 1100 W. Oak St., Zionsville, 7pm
  3. Various other in-person training sponsored by the Crossroads of America Council – see previous article here;
  4. Online at my.scouting.org .  [Tip:  Be sure to check your browser to use this site, it prefers to use the latest versions of  Google Chrome, MS Internet Explorer, Apple Safari or Mozilla Firefox.]

Cub Scout Open Houses 2018 – FYI

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North Star Cub Scout Open Houses are on the following dates (all start times 6:30 pm):

Monday Aug 13:  St. Joan of ArcCub Scout logo

Tuesday Aug 14:  Washington Twp. Elementary Schools (Crooked Creek, Fox Hill, Greenbriar, Nora, Spring Mill)

Wednesday Aug 15:  Zionsville Community Elementary Schools (Boone Meadow, Eagle, Pleasant View, Stonegate, Union)

Tuesday Aug 21:  Butler Labs

Thursday Aug 23:  Pike Twp. Elementary Schools (Central, College Park, Deer Run, Eagle Creek, Eastbrook, Fishback, Guion Creek, New Augusta South, Snacks Crossing)

More schools will likely be added soon as their scheduling is confirmed.

You can also visit the Crossroads of America Council Facebook “Events” page to follow individual Open House events:  CAC Events Page .

 

Social Media standards for Family Scouting Marketing

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BSA has provided guidance for marketing Family Scouting. In some part it is simply a reminder to follow the Scout Law in marketing with concrete examples of violations of the Scout Law in this context.

Even so, it gives a checklist of “don’ts.”

Make sure you review this against your unit websites and emails.

Roles of Adult Leaders: Men & Women

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As the BSA moves to being 100% co-ed, we need to study carefully what makes the BSA uniquely successful. In business this is called “best practices.” Best practices are an attempt to articulate in clear language and procedures what patterns of behavior in a business consistently lead to success, wherever tried.

The BSA has a history of moving adult leadership toward co-ed, so that once what was solely the province of men is now open to open women, too, especially the role of Scoutmaster. Even within our own district we have had successful female scoutmasters and cubmasters leading boys.

As girls move into the provinces that were once for boys only, we should consider with diligent care what are the Best Practices of leading scouts and cub scouts.

Since BSA adult leadership has been dominated by men with consistent involvement of women, some of the habits and practices that we have generated have come spontaneously from typical male leadership patterns. They are habits arising without thought or discussion. Some typically-male practices have been encouraged, such as the tendency toward a rougher and more chaotic pattern of play and participation. Some typically-male practices have been discouraged or outright banned, such as yelling orders at boys or hazing.

Psychologically we know that women tend to be more nurturing, protective, and risk avoiding, especially of infants and younger children; men tend to be more physically playful, bombastic, and risk inviting. According to Professor of Psychology Jordan Peterson, these two patterns help support one another in developing the most well balanced children. Both are essential to a psychologically healthy child. (Most of the analysis below is Peterson’s.)

Mothers create a safe environment where a child knows that the child will be well cared for when the child runs into problems, conflicts, or chaos. Mothers physically embrace and comfort children without hesitation when problems arise. Mothers speak soothingly and tenderly, allowing the child to right himself from whatever has upset him. This comfort and soothing are critical to allow a child to quickly find balance after something disrupt the calm surrounding the child. When my son was small, and even today as prepares to leave for college, when he is upset or frustrated, he is most likely to talk to my wife. My wife gives my son peace of mind.

Fathers create a risky environment where a child can explore the boundaries of the child’s body, its capabilities, and its limitations and of the world-at-large. Fathers are more likely to engage in rough and tumble play with the children. Children learn the limits of their bodies in such play. They learn that dad is heavier and harder to hurt. They learn there are consequences for inflicting pain on playmates. They learn difference between play and real fights. But most interestingly, children are so motivated by play that when dad tells them to do their homework before playing with dad, the children are more likely to do the dreary work first in order to be able to play with dad. This is one of the first and most effective means of teaching children the value of delayed gratification. When my son was younger, assuming dinner wasn’t ready, I would often toss my infant son up in the air and catch him, or tickle him. As he got older, I would change clothes then wrestle with him on the bed or do whatever game caught his attention at the time.

The father’s role in learning makes sense. Since we are creatures with bodies, our learning begins in the physical body’s interaction with the world. Our actions teach us more about the world than do our brains. We learn stoves are hot and dangerous through feeling heat (and hopefully avoiding contact). We learn how balls bounce through playing with balls, not reading books.

We learn how to walk through trying, while scientists are just now figuring out how to have robots do the same thing. This is called “embodied learning.” Robot designers have struggled with how to teach robots how to perceive and adapt to the world. They have used enormous amounts of computer processing and had little success. When they changed their perspective and focused on how a robot with a body would interact with the world, they quickly made huge break throughs. We embody learning because our bodies are our point of contact with the external world.

We learn love from mother’s caresses and hugs. We learn to walk by climbing up tables and trying our first steps. We learn to read by touching the page with our fingers to track where the next letter will be. We learn to treat others well through rough and tumble play. We learn to clean dishes after a meal when there are no clean dishes at the next meal. We learn to plan ahead by physically suffering from bad choices previously made. There becomes a desire to avoid the suffering the next time.

This physicality of embodied learning is a natural strength for male leaders. It encourages trial and error. It encourages individuality. It allows maturity-appropriate suffering while always avoiding and teaching the risks of life- or health-threatening suffering. Embodied learning is a core component of scouting.

So as girls become more involved in scouting, we have to be able to assess where male and female leaders strengths best serve our Best Practices.

We need to consider our Youth Protection Training and natural inclinations arising from chivalric principles about how men should treat and interact with women and young girls. How do we offer girls the benefits of embodied learning and physicality generally without overstepping our bounds, especially for male leaders?

I would suggest we recognize that these girls are joining Cub Scouts and likely will join Scouts BSA to have the experience of risk-taking, embodied learning, and other characteristics of male play that the girls have found lacking in other extracurricular offerings. We need to offer these girls what they have come for.

That means that mothers and fathers who are more risk averse for their “fragile” daughters need to be coached about the value of embodied learning that challenges these girls’ self-imposed limits. We need these mothers and fathers to recognize these challenges will make the girls anti-fragile. As a result, these girls will be happier, more self-confident, and more resilient.

In other words, we need to grow comfortable with telling the daughters’ parents that we don’t intend to water down the BSA program for their daughters. It is the undiluted BSA program that works. In essessence, we need to be prepared to explain why scouting works for boys and girls.

2018 Membership Roundup meeting

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Mark your calendars for Thursday July 12 – the 2018 Membership Roundup meeting will be held that evening from 6:00 – 9:00 pm at St. Luke’s United Methodist Church, 100 West 86th St., Indianapolis 46260.  This will be held in rooms N101 and N102.  More details to follow!

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Save the Date! Open House training May 30 – on Facebook LIVE

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From Crossroads of America Communication Executive Karrie Baxter:

 

Join us on Facebook Live: www.facebook.com/bsacrossroads. Follow us if you aren’t already for updates!

Here’s what you can expect to see:

  • Supplies to promote your pack at the open house, through your school, and through your community. We’ve got some really exciting and interactive pieces to show you!

  • Why is it important to attend the open house? Let us show you!

  • An example of an Open House Table Set up

  • Breakdown of our NEW lead generation technology and how we will help communicate with people who are interested in your pack.

Trust us, you won’t want to miss it. Come represent your unit LIVE on Facebook- May 30th at 7PM!

 

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