Benefits of Eagle Rank

REMINDER: District meetings

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Thursday, October 5, 2017 at Second Presbyterian Church, 4th Floor:

  1. Commissioners: 6:00 pm, Room 401
  2. District Committee: 7:00 pm, Room 405

Thursday, October 12, 2017 at 7:00 pm (except where different below), Luke’s Lodge, outbuilding on Campus of St Luke’s United Methodist Church, 100 W. 86th St.

1. Youth Protection Training (Y01) (6:30 pm)

2. Boy Scout Roundtable: TBA. Possible topic: path to Eagle.

3. Cub Scout Roundtable: planning your next camp out. Presented by Scouts from Troop 56 and RTC Bill Buchalter. (Great for Pack Programming Chair, Pack Chair, Cubmaster and Den Leaders, especially Webelos Den Leaders). Tents and gear explained.

4. Rechartering breakout for Unit Rechartering Coordinators. How to rechartering. Changes to system.

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Adults Wearing Eagle Pins

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Since a refrain at an Eagle Court of Honor is “once an Eagle, alway an Eagle,” can adult Eagles wear their Eagle Scout Pin?

We all know that the Eagle Scout patch should be retired from a scout uniform, when the scout turns 18 and becomes an Assistant Scoutmaster. He then can wear the Eagle knot for the rest of his life.

But can the adult wear his Eagle Pin to an Eagle Court of Honor.

Bryan on Scouting tried to address this in 2014. Unfortunately, his article was slightly incorrect. I met Bryan at National Jamboree this past summer. Having read his material for years, I can vouch that he does his research thoroughly, and his personality in person is very humble and self-effacing. Consequently, I believe his error is less a lack of diligence than a lack of clarity in the scouting literature.

Simply put, the Boy Scout Insignia Guide allows an adult to wear the pin for “formal Eagle occasions.”

Eagle Pin Insignia rule
Excerpt from Insignia Guide

So if we are trying to make sure that a new Eagle Scout feels part of a larger circle of scouts and scouters, we can encourage all Eagles to wear their pins to the Eagle Court of Honor.

This accomplishes two key goals, among many others. First, it allows the new Eagle Scout, the non-scouting visitors, and the newer scouts to see the people who are Eagles more clearly. The men whom they respect wear the pin. Second, it allows more people to identify the Eagle knot. This means that some of the mystery of an adult’s uniform is removed. With greater real recognition, more adults may seek the company of existing Eagles as mentors in scouting, and more youth will seek to join their company as fellow Eagle Scouts.

Eagle Knot
Eagle Knot (without either palms or border indicating lifetime NESA membership)

Congratulations to 2016 NESA Scholarship winners

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The National Eagle Scout Association (“NESA”) has posted the winners of their 2016 scholarship winners for the Central Region. Congratulations to the three Crossroads of America Council recipients.Eagle pin

2016 NESA SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS
CENTRAL REGION

 

NAME COUNCIL NAME COUNCIL CITY/STATE

$25,000 Cooke Academic Scholarship

Alex Wolff Glaciers Edge Council Madison, WI

$3,000 NESA Academic Scholarships

Marc Berkowicz Three Fires Council St. Charles, IL
Chris Coraggio Crossroads of America Council Indianapolis, IN
Jacob Danek Crossroads of America Council Indianapolis, IN
Jack Gibfried Ozark Trails Council Springfield, MO
Nathaniel Helgeson Heart of America Council Kansas City, MO
Colm Kilcoin Great Lakes FSC Detroit, MI
Joseph Miller-Davis Erie Shores Council Toledo, OH
Jacob Quigley Rainbow Council Morris, IL
Michael Rushka Crossroads of America Council Indianapolis, IN
Gabriel Small Northeast Illinois Council Highland Park, IL
Adam Smith Bay-Lakes Council Appleton, WI
Zachary Utecht President Gerald R. Ford Council Grand Rapids, MI
Ryan Wagner Heart of America Council Kansas City, MO

$2,500 Cooke Academic Scholarships

Robert Agle Simon Kenton Council Columbus, OH
Benjamin Ashby Lewis & Clark Council Belleville, IL
Alexander Burroughs Heart of America Council Kansas City, MO
Renaud Chauret Sagamore Council Kokomo, IN
Kevin McMahon Gamehaven Council Rochester, MN
Connor Polodna Gamehaven Council Rochester, MN
Shane Redman Blackhawk Area Council Rockford, IL
Cameron Reed Greater Cleveland Council Cleveland, OH
Tevis Robinson Buckskin Council Charleston, WV
Evan Routhier Bay-Lakes Council Appleton, WI
Dylan Subrin Blackhawk Area Council Rockford, IL
Joseph Switala Water and Woods Council Flint, MI
Mathew Townsley Illowa Council Davenport, IA

$5,000 Hall/McElwain Merit Scholarships

Cole Branson Great Rivers Council Columbia, MO
Brian Coe Three Harbors Council Milwaukee, WI
Samuel Gentle Northern Star Council St. Paul, MN
Kenneth Kelley Dan Beard Council Cincinnati, OH
John Kloser Three Harbors Council Milwaukee, WI
Christopher Kreienkamp Gateway Area Council La Crosse, WI
John Rosher Heart of America Council Kansas City, MO
Brice Steiner Simon Kenton Council Columbus, OH
Eric Tabaka Glaciers Edge Council Madison, WI

$4,000 Bailey Merit Scholarship

Kyle Kolash Bay-Lakes Council Appleton, WI

$2,500 Palmer Merit Scholarship

Austin Arenz Bay Lakes Council Appleton, WI

$2,500 Michael S. Malone/Windrush Publishers Journalism Scholarship

Justin Curto Heart of America Council Kansas City, MO

© 2017 The National Eagle Scout Association | Boy Scouts of America | National Eagle Scout Association

 

Troop 358 has 3 new Palms

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I attended last Monday’s Court of Honor for Troop 358 in Zionsville. The troop award an Eagle Scout medal, various rank advancements, merit badges, and Wood Badge beading for OA Advisor Mark Pishon, ASM Chuck Bricker, and ASM David Guzman.

The most unique part of the ceremony to my eyes was the award of three Eagle Palms. The first was for a bronze palm (the first palm awarded for 5 merit badge and 3 months leadership service after receiving Eagle). The second was for a scout’s silver palm (the third palm awarded for 15 merit badges and 9 months service after Eagle). The last was a second Silver Palmeagle-palms-features

Think about that. A second Silver Palm for one scout. That means that he has served in his troop for 18 months as a leader after his Eagle Board of Review and earned an additional 30 merit badges in addition to the required 21 merit badge for Eagle Scout. Only 1/10th of 1% of Eagles earn a Silver Palm. To earn two Silver Palms is extraordinarily rare. (I cannot find the stats.)

Shown above from left: Matthew Heath, second Silver Palm; Josh Sheppard, first Silver Palm; John Heath, first Bronze Palm. All are White Stag/NYLT trained and have served on staff, too. 

Congratulations to each of these three worthy scouts and to Scoutmaster Jim Beck and Troop 358 for providing such a rewarding environment that Eagle Scouts stay actively involved in the troop.

Scholarships and Recognition for Eagle Scouts

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While we all know that scouting is more than just the attainment of Eagle, earning the Eagle rank does offer some perks.

First, the Council has several Council-wide scholarships or recognitions. Take a look at the Council website for more information. Many have deadlines in the next 30 days. District Advancement Chair Mark Pishon reports that new forms for those programs were just issued.

The John Price Scholarship is named for the late Judge John Price who sat on the Marion County Municipal then Superior Courts bench for many years. He was an avid member of the Downtown Kiwanis Club and Crossroads of America Council. I had the honor of knowing him from court and Kiwanis. His grandsons were recently members of a North Star Troop.

Second, Eagle Scouts who enlist in the military automatically are promoted upon completion of basic training. Here is some information about the Marine Corps version.

Third, many scholarship programs and recognitions are available at the local, state, and national levels. More exist than I can count.

The most famous scholarships are the National Eagle Scout Association scholarships.

Many other programs not officially seeking Eagle Scouts look favorably on Eagle Scouts, so look everywhere!