Latest Event Updates

Spring Camporee Update

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From Mark Pishon, Spring Camporee Chair:

Dear Troop Key 3 and Camporee Adult Volunteers:

There is a Camporee Meeting this Sunday, April 2, 2017 most likely at St. Luke’s Lodge from 6:30 to 8:00 pm.  [Confirmation from church on room reservation still pending.] Please have a troop representative there.

Registration is open at this link.

Remember the troop registration deadline is Midnight April 3, 2017 for shooters.

The updated Committee Work Plan is attached.

The updated Flyer and Patch is attached to use in you communications.

The Spring Camporee Committee needs 3 things from each troop by April 4, 2017 (Email: mpishon@gmail ).

  1. Top 3 Campsite Preference
  2. Name of an Adult Volunteer that will support North Star on Saturday (one minimum per troop).
  3. Select at least one of these troop assignments:
  • Saturday Morning Flag
  • Saturday Flag Lowering
  • Scouts Own Service
  • Troop to feed range and orienteering volunteers (16)
  • Friday Campfire
  • Saturday Campfire

Yours in Scouting,
Mark Pishon
Spring Camporee Chair
North Star District
Cell 317.374.2262

Shoot the Moon Overview PowerPoint

Spring Camporee Planning Summary 3_21_2017 Update

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Preparations for Order of the Arrow Call Out Have Begun

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From our chapter Order of the Arrow Advisor Mark Pishon:

Dear Troop Key 3:

Please send me your troops OA Election results ASAP.  Call-Outs are April 22 [at Spring Camporee].  Forms are attached.

Mark Pishon
LOA Chapter Adviser
317.374.2262 

  1. OA Inductions – Adult Candidate Form
  2. OA Inductions Unit Election Form 2016

Since Troops 72 and 180 have worked as part of OA chapter in the past, the March 29th approval of district changes should not affect these units. Other T’Sun Gani units will need to be in contact with Pioneer’s Order of the Arrow Chapter for Call Out procedures in April. Please share this information with them, so that they are not confused.

Here are our top 4 finishers from right to left.

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1. Landon Walsh Pack 358 Muncee Tribe
2. Thomas Weintraut Pack 358 Muncee Tribe
3. Colby Lindeman, Pack 18
4. Steven Jarvis, Pack 625

District pinewood derby live

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We are live at the district pinewood derby. To see  more videos, go to Facebook.

Amazon smile to Support Council

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If you regularly use Amazon, you can make regular contributions to the Crossroads of America Council by using http://www.smile.amazon.com. You buy the same things at the same price, but a small percentage goes to the charity of your choice.

Crossroads of America Council is one of those options.

Today, Amazon made this announcement:

Great news. Customers just ranked Amazon #1 in the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) with a score of 86. ACSI surveyed over 10,000 customers to measure perceptions of quality and value across retailers nationwide. This comes right on the heels of movies from Amazon Studios winning three Oscars and Amazon being ranked #1 in corporate reputation by the Harris Poll.

We want to celebrate the recognition, and say thank you for your support.

On Thursday, March 16 only, we will donate 5% (10 times our usual donation rate) of the purchase price of eligible products you buy at AmazonSmile (smile.amazon.com) to charity. AmazonSmile is a way to shop that offers the same shopping experience as Amazon.com, but every eligible purchase you make at smile.amazon.com helps support a charity of your choice. To date, we’ve donated over $46 million.

To take advantage of this offer—and to ensure that your shopping throughout the year benefits your favorite charitable organization—just start your shopping at smile.amazon.com.

Thank you. And, be assured, we’ll continue working hard for you every day.

If you are planning to make Amazon purchases in the next week, please name the Council as your charity and buy today.

Why Unique Scouting Jargon?

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Like most human specialized endeavors, Scouting has its own unique jargon. We often use these terms without much thought about their original meaning or its meaning as time has passed. Let’s stop and examine this language for a few minutes to see what we can learn about the philosophy of scouting.

The terms Cubmaster and Scoutmaster are used every day. There is even a movement to change these terms. Many national councils in the Worldwide Movement of Scouting have already taken this step. What does the term “master” mean in this context?

In Baden-Powell’s youthful days (1850-1880), a school teacher was referred to a “school master.” The teacher might have had a Master’s Degree. These were the 19th century license to teach. They had mastered the material well enough to teach the material.

Notice it is not a reference the doctrine of law known as “master-servant” or other less savory references that the XXXIII Amendment to the Constitution outlawed.

Knowing what Baden-Powell meant when he chose the term, does it change your vision of what a Cubmaster or Scoutmaster should do when working with Den Leaders or Senior Patrol Leaders, respectively? Look to some of the early stories from Wood Badge leaders about their first experiences as scouts trying to figure out how to build fires, pick camping sites, or hike without going in circles. The need for a teacher was clear. In some of the stories, the boys would set up tents but the police would show up and march them home, because no adult was present to vouch for the boys’ good intentions. The need for an adult mentor, not just an older brother was also clear.

Council is a very strange term. In the late 19th Century, British government was moving away from Administrators with sole responsibility. They were moving toward a more collective method of organizing. Councils sprung up everywhere in British society. They were not corporations. In American parlance, we would tend to use the term “committee.” Since Baden Powell was encouraging a “Scouting Movement” not a “scouting organization,” the idea of individuals coming to together more informally fit his vision for what scouting should be.

Commissioner is a very strange term. In the Commissioner literature, the attempt to explain the term is that Baden Powell wanted to rely on the landed gentry, who did not work for living to advise new scoutmasters. He chose an archaic term of Commissioner from the 13th Century. Council Commissioner’s Training Manual, pg. 57 (2009) tells the story this way:

The word “commission” dates back to 1344, when it was derived from the Latin word commissionem, meaning “delegation of business.” The nation’s monarch delegated authority to a deserving few.

Individuals identified by the monarch had to qualify as a “gentleman,” legally defined as a man who earned his income from property and as such was independently wealthy with time to devote to other agendas. It was exactly this kind of man that Lord Baden-Powell wanted as his volunteer commissioners: men of both money and leisure. [ed.: too bad this era has past.]

Baden-Powell’s first chief Scout commissioner was Lieutenant General Sir Edmond Roche Elles Baden-Powell’s commissioners included W F deBois MacLaren, who donated Gilwell Park; and Rudyard Kipling, author of The Jungle Book [ed.: and the source material for Cub Scout concepts].

As communities formed more troops, it became evident that leadership was needed to maintain standards, provide camping opportunities, recruit leaders, give training, establish local courts of honor, and stimulate local Scouting This person was the commissioner.

The Scout commissioner represented the local community committee or council. A great deal of importance was placed upon the selection of this man. He was expected to have a great deal of outdoor experience and act as the local authority in all Scoutcraft matters.

While originally a volunteer, in some areas the community was able to raise enough funds for the Scout commissioner to become a salaried position.

The areas with paid leadership positions, such as a Scout executive or executive secretary, became known as first-class councils, while those with a volunteer head, still called the Scout commissioner, were known as second-class councils. By 1931, there was only one second-class council left.

The wreath of service that surrounds all commissioner and professional position badges is a symbol of the service rendered to units. It also symbolizes the continued partnership between volunteers and professionals.

Sometimes a return to original definitions helps better understand how we can improve our service to youth, as an indirect means of returning to first principles.

Spring Camporee Planning Report

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Here are minutes from the last Spring Camporee planning meeting from Spring Camporee Chair Mark Pishon of Troop 358.

Minutes

Mark’s Power Point presentation

Camporee Banner

Due to the firearms involved with this camporee and the Guide to Safe Scouting prohibitions on Cub Scout and Webelos firing these weapons, this is a very bad camporee to invite them. District is highly discouraging Cub Scouts’ or Webelos’ attendance. They would see guns and want to participate. It would be mean to tantalize them and not allow them to participate.

District Email Subscription List Updated

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Council has finalized the units’ rosters after the 2017 Recharter closing on February 28, 2017. We have added all registered adults in the District to the mailing list this morning.

As you know, the email is a compilation of articles posted on the District Website over the previous seven days.

If one of your leaders complains that they have previously Unsubscribed from this list but are being re-added without their permission, there is likely a simple explanation.

The system we use is Mail Chimp. It automatically reviews new email subscriptions. It looks for previous email addresses that have unsubscribed. These emails are NOT re-subscribed without an affirmative subscription from the recipient.

If a leader has an alternate email or has given the BSA a different email address, since their last unsubscribe, the volunteer is being added based on the new email address and NOT their name. Ask them to unsubscribe again for the new email address. Every email blast has an UNSUBSCRIBE at the bottom of the email. Have the leader scroll to the bottom of the offending email and click on that link.

If you have a leader who wishes to be included or has joined after recharter, please have them subscribe at this link. This same subscription link is also at the top of the district website under “About.”

If you have a leader who wishes to change their email address on the mail list, the leader can click on “Update Subscription Preferences” at the bottom of the email.

As always, please email ideas and timely topics for articles on the website. Give us a reported success of your unit. Include links to your unit website. Remember in the age of Google and social media, one of the ways to drive traffic to your website or move higher on Google’s list is to have links from other websites. Your submitted articles to us with links back to your website will help your general public traffic to your website.

Here’s to another great year with the Council-Leading North Star District! (Highest scoring JTE District in CAC: 2800 out of 3000 points.)

District Pinewood Derby Saturday!

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Just a quick reminder that the District Pinewood Derby is this Saturday at the American Legion Post.

Reservations are NOT required but are encouraged. See calendar for more information on location and time.